Thank you friends!!!

I want to thank each of you who came out for the holdiay studio sale over the last two weekends.  I feel really good about the pots I had to offer, most of which left with you to fulfill a high purpose in your homes. 

I have a cupboard full of pots which I use every day.  And I know how much those pots consistently affect my daily life.  While they are made by a very wide variety of potters from around the world, each one holds a place in my heart and every time I use one, it is like having a conversation with their maker...They have become truly mine, and yet they connect me to their makers and to human beings in general.  I am so grateful to each of their makers for bringing such lovely objects into being, but at the same time, I know there is now some unique relationship which I now share with each of these objects....cups, plates, baking dishes which are now a part of the best tapestry of my daily life.  I love that!  It is what keeps me interested as a maker too - I love that each of the pots, conceived in my mind by the familiar movements of my hands, now have layers of meaning which have grown in the relationship each of you have forged with the pots I made and which you purchased.

 Really, it is a very simple value proposition; I make pots, put as much into each one as I can.  You see, touch pots which touch something inside yourself and you buy them....and hopefully it is a bargain for us both!  I am so grateful and privileged to make a living by doing something I love to do so dearly!  For my part, I promise to continue making pots that are honest and dense with the content of my heart.  Thanks truly for "getting it" and connecting with the pots!  

Here's a lovely teabowl I use almost every day....it was made by Guillermo Cuellar who has a studio in the St. Croix Valley of Minnesota.....he made it and he speaks to me through it every day, but it's MY teabowl now....I do love it....

Merry Christmas!

 

 

I have found a green....

Stoneware Yunomi with crackle slip, green ash glaze, amber ash glaze

Stoneware Yunomi with crackle slip, green ash glaze, amber ash glaze

First, I have to admit that I’m pretty sure I stole the title above from an article by Warren Mackenzie, the consummate American potter, which I read 15 or 20 years ago (I cannot find it to cite it).  When I read that article, I hoped it would be an easy answer to what has been a life-long search for the right green glaze.  It wasn't (but I enjoyed the article nonetheless).  Since then, I've fired countless test-tiles of experimental glazes and flirted with a handful of potential contenders, but have always lost interest or lost patience with all of the green glazes I've used over the years.

I think I have finally found what I've been looking for.  Like most of the other glazes I use, this is a glaze which uses wood ash as a primary ingredient.  It is, in fact, a variant of a glaze I have been using for many years; a few ingredients have been removed or reduced and a small proportion of copper carbonate has been added.  The result is a glaze which seems (so far) to meet all my requirements for a long term relationship:

 

Carved Porcelain Plate with green ash glaze  

Carved Porcelain Plate with green ash glaze

 

Stoneware bowl,  crackle slip, green ash, chun glazes

Stoneware bowl,  crackle slip, green ash, chun glazes

-The glaze is influenced greatly by the clay body and slips over which it is applied.  Over porcelain and various kaolin slips, it varies from a "fat," semi-mat, deep green or turquoise with the ability to develop occasional patches of pinks and reds, to a nearly transparent glossy hint of green-almost a very faint celadon. The fired colors and textures are very receptive to variations in kiln atmosphere, application thickness, temperature, location in the kiln and cooling rates.  In other words, it will take some serious time, perhaps more than a lifetime, to learn how to get the results desired for any given piece and ultimately, I suspect there will always be some surprises with this glaze.


Stoneware bowl with triangle pattern and crackle slip, ash glazes

Stoneware bowl with triangle pattern and crackle slip, ash glazes

-Over iron-rich stoneware clay bodies, the glaze varies even more dramatically; from an iron-spotted, gray, nearly opaque surface to a shiny and very runny mottled bottle-green.  It also sometimes produces an (as yet) unexplained blue halo on the insides of bowls and other closed forms. The same variables mentioned above which can make it so striking on porcelain seem to have varying and often opposite results on stoneware, which further fuels my interest.

 

Stoneware bowl with crackle slip, ash glazes.

Stoneware bowl with crackle slip, ash glazes.

Porcelain Mug, Green Ash Glaze  

Porcelain Mug, Green Ash Glaze

 

-Finally, this glaze, like most of the other ash glazes I have developed, is quite conducive to the growth of orange to black crystals in the glaze matrix during the cooling phase of firings.  The coverage and size of the crystals is influenced by the rate of cooling during the initial 200-300F drop at the conclusion of the firing and by the atmosphere in the kiln during this phase.

 

Stoneware Yunomi, crackle slip, green ash glaze

Stoneware Yunomi, crackle slip, green ash glaze

There is enough here to keep me interested for a long time. It could be conjectured that the bullet points listed above do not qualify this glaze as a "keeper," but rather would make such a glaze unreliable and perhaps even a fool's path to follow in pursuit of professional and financial success.  It could indeed, and I am ecstatic anyway because I have found a green!  It makes the prospect of making a living as a potter look a little less anachronistic in comparison.  

 

I look forward to introducing some pots with this new glaze to public scrutiny at my Summer 2014 Kiln Opening.  The exact dates have not been finalized, but I'm looking at the 3rd and 4th weekends of June.  Will you be in town?  Let me know, if you like and watch here for an announcement early next week.  I hope to see you there!  Sincere "Thanks!" to those of you who have provided early feedback on this glaze and beta-tested new pots in your homes!

Oh, and if you're someone who doesn't like green glazes (and who has managed to read this far), fear ye not; I'm still making lots of pots in more familiar palettes:

Porcelain bowl, slip decoration and caved rim.  Ash glazes.  

Porcelain bowl, slip decoration and caved rim.  Ash glazes.

 


Big Pots

Starting to make some bigger pots in anticipation of fall shows and studio sales.  Here is a range of recent stoneware Jars and vases - Lots of glazing and firing still ahead!  If you would like to receive an email or postcard notification of future shows and studio sales, be sure to submit your contact info on the Contact page or via Facebook on the kiln opening mailing list form.  

New Canister Sets

These are some new canisters I've been working on - Range from about 12" tall to 8" tall.  This particular set has squared sides and are made from stoneware clay with a thick porcelain slip over the sides w/finger-combing through the slip...Obviously, they have not been fired yet, but I am liking the design.  In the background you can see another set which have round sides and push-outs from the inside, similar to some of my new teabowls.  I will be posting a photo of some bigger pots I'm working on in the next few days - watch here for updates or on the facebook page.

Canister Set - Stoneware w/Porcelain Slip